Government Information

Earl Gregg Swem Library

A Profile of the Working Poor, 2015

Categories: Headlines,Income/Poverty,Labor/Employment,Statistics

https://www.bls.gov/opub/reports/working-poor/2015/home.htm

Puts the number of “working poor,” those with jobs but earning below the official poverty level, in 2015 at 8.6 million.  Women and minorities were more likely to be among the working poor.  Statistical tables show trends since 2007 and demographic characteristics of the working poor including education attainment, occupation, and labor market problems.  From the Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

Employment Characteristics of Families, 2016

Categories: Labor/Employment,Marriage/Family,Statistics

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/famee_04202017.pdf

In 2016, 6.5% of families included an unemployed person, down from 6.9% in 2015.  Includes statistics on employment and unemployment by family characteristics.  From the Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

Comparing the Compensation of Federal and Private-Sector Employees, 2011 to 2015

Categories: Education-Higher,Govt Personnel,Income/Poverty,Labor/Employment,Statistics

https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/reports/52637-federalprivatepay.pdf

Compares differences in wages and benefits for federal and private-sector workers and finds the differences vary depending on the employees’ educational attainment.  From the Congressional Budget Office

 

 

Arts Data Profile: State-Level Estimates of Arts and Cultural Employment: 2001-2014: Research Brief #2: Trends in Arts and Cultural Employment

Categories: Arts/Humanities,Labor/Employment,Statistics

https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/files/Brief2Access-trends-arts-and-cultural-employment.pdf

Examines state-level trends in employment patterns in the arts for the past year and from the time of the Great Recession in 2008.  From the National Endowment for the Arts

 

Arts Data Profile: State-Level Estimates of Arts and Cultural Employment: 2001-2014: Research Brief #1: State Highlights of Arts and Cultural Employment and Compensation 2014

Categories: Arts/Humanities,Income/Poverty,Labor/Employment,Statistics

https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/files/Brief1Access-highlights-arts-and-cultural-employment.pdf

Identifies states with the highest concentration of workers in arts fields and the types of fields in which they work.  Also shows the states with the highest levels of compensation for workers in arts-related fields.  From the National Endowment for the Arts

 

Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers, 2016

Categories: Headlines,Income/Poverty,Labor/Employment,Statistics

https://www.bls.gov/opub/reports/minimum-wage/2016/home.htm

2.2 million workers had wages at or below the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour in 2016 and represented 2.7% of all hourly paid workers.  This report presents highlights and statistical tables  on U.S. workers who earned at or below the federal minimum wage.  From the Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood: 1975-2016

Categories: Education-Higher,Headlines,Labor/Employment,Marriage/Family,Population/Census,Statistics

https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2017/demo/p20-579.pdf

Looks at how the experiences of young adults today differ from those of the 1970s including choosing to go to college, the ability start a family or live independently of parents, and how work experience and education vary across living arrangements.  From the Census Bureau

 

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook

Categories: Disability,Education,Income/Poverty,Labor Unions,Labor/Employment,Statistics,Veterans,Women

https://www.bls.gov/opub/reports/womens-databook/2016/home.htm

Labor force participation by women reached a peak in the U.S. in 1999 with a rate of 60% and has since declined to 56.7% in 2015.  This report presents historical and recent labor force participation and earnings data for men and women from the Current Population Survey.  From the Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

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