Government Information

Earl Gregg Swem Library

Trends in Hysterectomies and Oophorectomies in Hospital Inpatient and Ambulatory Settings, 2005-2013

Categories: Health Insurance,Health/Medical,Statistics

http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb214-Hysterectomy-Oophorectomy-Trends.pdf

Removal of the uterus is the second most common surgical procedure among women in the U.S. with more than 265,000 hysterectomies performed annually.  This report provides an overview of patient and hospital characteristics for such procedures. From the National Center for Health Statistics

 

Problems Paying Medical Bills Among Persons Under Age 65: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2011 – June 2016

Categories: Health Insurance,Health/Medical,Prices/Inflation,Statistics

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhis/earlyrelease/probs_paying_medical_bills_jan_2011_jun_2016.pdf

The percentage of persons in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 21% to 16% or by 13 million following enactment of the Affordable Care Act.  There were similar decreases in families with children.  Covers selected demographic characteristics and insurance status.   From the National Center for Health Statistics

 

Concentration of Health Expenditures in the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, 2014

Categories: Children,Elderly,Health Insurance,Health/Medical,Statistics

https://meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_files/publications/st497/stat497.pdf

In 2014 health care spending accounted for 17.5% of the U.S. GDP, yet only 5% of the population accounted for over half of all health care spending.  This report tracks spending among sub-populations based on age and insurance status.  From the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

 

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2016

Categories: Health Insurance,Laws/Regulations,Medicare/Medicaid,Statistics

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhis/earlyrelease/insur201611.pdf

Provides estimates of those covered by health insurance for selected states.  In the first 6 months of 2016, 28 million persons of all ages were uninsured or 8.9% of the population.  This was 20 million fewer than in 2010, prior to the Affordable Care Act, but only 0.2 million fewer persons than in 2015.  From the National Center for Health Statistics

 

Health Care Access and Utilization Among Adults Aged 18-64, by Poverty Level: United States, 2013-2015

Categories: Health Insurance,Income/Poverty,Laws/Regulations,Statistics

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db262.pdf

Tracks the effect of the Affordable Care Act on health insurance coverage in the U.S.  The percentage of adults who were poor and uninsured decreased from 40% to 26%, the near-poor from 39% to 24%, and the not-poor from 12% to 8%.  From the National Center for Health Statistics

 

Characteristics of Persons with High Health Care Expenditures in the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population 2014

Categories: Health Insurance,Health/Medical,Statistics

https://meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_files/publications/st496/stat496.pdf

Compares characteristics of the population for four health care spending tiers: no, low, middle, and high expenditure levels.  Three-quarters of the high spending group were persons 45 or older.  From the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

 

Characteristics of Safety-Net Hospitals, 2014

Categories: Health Insurance,Health/Medical,Income/Poverty,Statistics

http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb213-Safety-Net-Hospitals-2014.pdf

Examines the nature and workload of safety-net hospitals—those which provide health care to patients with no insurance  or with Medicaid.  Includes the lengths of stays, the types of services provided, and the costs.  From the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

 

Assessing the Effect of the Affordable Care Act on Part-Time Employment

Categories: Health Insurance,Labor/Employment,Laws/Regulations

https://www.richmondfed.org/-/media/richmondfedorg/publications/research/economic_brief/2016/pdf/eb_16-10.pdf

Considers whether penalties in the Affordable Care Act for large employers who do not offer health insurance to full-time workers has brought about an increase in the use of part-time labor.  From the Richmond Federal Reserve Bank

 

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